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Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho
New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho

New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

(via akinsman)


liquidlyrium: Is your next tattoo gonna be achilles doing a backside ollie over agamemnon?

 Yesssss

 In all seriousness, I was considering buying some body paint and painting little outfits on my Achilles tattoo for shits and giggles. Give him board shorts and a wicked cool backward baseball cap with a little skateboard.


He comes on with his big, innocent farm boy routine, but I could see through that in a Peloponnesian minute.

(Source: varsois, via princekraken)


AGAMEMNON: all of you will swear allegiance to me
ACHILLES: [skateboards by] who the fuck is this clown?


 It’s the 75th anniversary of the start of WWII today.

 Canada, during WWI, was still considered a colony of England’s, and therefore was at the mercy of English rule. They had little choice in joining the First World War, and as soon as England declared, Canada was effectively also at war. However, WWII saw a new-found sense of Canadian independence, as Canada was now considered a former colony, and therefore in charge of her own fate. Despite this, and despite being separate from the war in Europe and in the Pacific, Canada declared war on Nazi Germany on September 10th, 1939, seven days after Great Britain.

 Canadian men and women signed up in droves to serve in a variety of capacities (by wars end, 1 million men will have signed up, out of a population of 11 million). At the start, Canada saw very little military action, and was instead used as a supplier to Great Britain, charged with the task of providing the besieged country with food and goods, including military vehicles and devices. With the help of the United States of America who sold engines and other mechanical goods for cheap to Canada (a still neutral country), Canada could provide Great Britain with the goods she needed for a fraction of the cost it took to produce them.

 Canada’s first major role would come at the Battle of the Atlantic. Canada’s navy at the start of the war was small, with Canada only owning seven war ships. By 1940, the navy had grown from 3,500 men to 10,000 men strong, and became the fourth largest navy in the world. Canada was charged with the task of keeping supply lines open across the Atlantic, and for delivering goods to Europe through these supply lines. This was no small task, as the German U-Boats that prowled the seas were known to be ruthless in their approach. Despite the odds, Canada managed to keep the trade routs opened, and supplied Europe with a reported 164,783,921 tons of cargo. Canada’s navy was also in charge of protecting the English Channel during the invasion of Normandy, ensuring a successful landing for the Allied powers involved that day.

 Canada’s success would not last long. In 1942, two years before the landing of Normandy, Great Britain ordered inexperienced Canadian soldiers to take the beach at Normandy— alone, save for 1,000 British troops for support. The battle would be known as the Dieppe Raid, or Operation Jubilee. The battle was a complete disaster; 900 Canadians died, over 500 were wounded, and over a thousand were taken as POW’s by the Germans. The RCAF also suffered heavy casualties. While the event served to teach the Allies on how not to approach the fortified French beach, this increased tension between Canada and England.

 But Canada would get back on her feet, and in 1943 Canadians were sent to Sicily and Italy to fight, making it so close to Rome, but were stripped of the glory of liberation when the Americans told them to stop so they could take it themselves. Canadian’s continued to move inland toward Germany along with the rest of Western Allied forces, and on June 6, 1944, Canada had her own beach to take during the Invasion of Normandy. A stronger, more experienced Canada sent her best men to fight and claim Juno Beach, the most fortified beach next to Omaha Beach (headed by the Americans). By the end of the day, Canadians had penetrated further into France than America or Britain.

 Canada’s biggest success came in the Netherlands. The royal family of the Netherlands had been moved to Canada during the war, and were offered safety and shelter. Princess Margriet was born in Canada, but the Canadian government had made the room she was born in ‘extraterritorial’, so it would be ensured that the Princess of the Netherlands was not Canadian but Dutch, despite the location she was born. Meanwhile, Canada fought long and hard in the Netherlands, and eventually liberated the country from Nazi control on May 5th 1945, when the German Commander surrendered to Canadians. Because of Canada’s role in the liberation of the Netherlands, the safety of their royal family, and the care given to starving civilians during the ‘hungry winter’, Canada and the Netherlands have retained close ties, with the Netherlands sending Canada 10,000 tulip bulbs every year, which Canada plants in front of her Parliament Buildings.

 By the end of the war, over 40,000 men died, a significant loss to a small population.


Saved two lost English tourists today. They were lost and trying to find their hotel, and had no idea where they were. One dude was on the pay phone outside the 7-11 desperately calling his friends who had already made it to the hotel.

 They had a rental car so my friend and I drove to the hotel with them following behind. My friend didn’t want to help because she’s paranoid or something, but I was like ‘THIS COULD BE ME IN A WEEK’ so she let me go chat to two strangers.

 Hopefully this pays it forward for when I’m lost in the middle of Europe.


She has the intelligence of her brother Willas, the observance of courtesies from Garlan, and the good looks of Loras. She has also inherited her father’s desire for advancement and the Queen of Thorn’s cunning - yet her ability to keep her true intentions hidden is completely her own. (inspired

(Source: theclashofqueens, via theclashofqueens)


 Cullen in DAO: That was inappropriate, dwarf. But what more could be expected from an ignorant cave-dwelling heathen?

Cullen in DAII: They [Qunari] are heathens. They will stop at nothing less than the eradication of the Chantry.

 Fandom: I wonder who the last race-gated LI will be!


The way that I want to portray it? No. But the way that it is written? Possibly yes. But it’s hard to say because in the book Loras is only seen as a public figure, so he’s only seen as Sansa’s muse. You don’t get to actually see Loras as who he really is behind closed doors. I just don’t think you get a true representation of who he really is in the books because you always see him from the perspective of a fangirl.

 Finn Jones when asked if he thinks there is a difference between Loras in the show and Loras in the books (x)

          

(via harrystyli)

I’m going to disagree with Finn a little bit. I think Loras drops the mask in his scenes with Jaime. He’s still arrogant, but you see the depth of his love for Renly and that he does have that introspective side.

The narrative itself gives you a good feel for his character too, or at least the way that he’s so devoted to his family that a) Littlefinger uses it to force the Tyrell’s hand in offing Joffrey and b) Cersei uses his desperation to defend Highgarden to send him on the suicide mission to Dragonstone.

(via guileandsubterfuge)

Thanks, guile. Not only do we get a good view of Loras in Jaime’s chapters, and Cersei’s, we get some insight in Tyrion’s as well. Loras’s most famous quote is in a Tyrion chapter: “When the sun has set, no candle can replace it.”

I love Finn, but I feel like he maybe didn’t actually read the books at all. How can you read all those Loras/Jaime conversations, or watch Loras fall to his knees and beg Cersei for a chance to commit suicide so he can save his family in Dance, and think you’re not getting a true representation of him?

(via chickren)

 A good idea from Cersei’s chapters? Nope, no way. Cersei sees Loras in the exact opposite of how Sansa sees him. She hates the kid because he’s a Tyrell— I’d hardly call her a reliable source. Not to mention we’ve no idea what Loras is playing at with regards to Dragonstone. I think part of his reactions in front of Cersei during AFFC (not Dance— he’s on ‘deaths door’ in Dance) is played up, for sure.

 Jaime? More so, but again, we have to be wary of how much Jaime projects himself upon Loras. While I think we see more of Loras with Jaime than we do anyone else, there is still definitely some projection going on. Plus, Jaime doesn’t know what’s truly going on in Loras’ head— no one knows that except for Loras and we’ve no POV chapter.

 With regards to Tyrion, he has one conversation with the Loras, and I think that small snippet is the most revealing of Loras.

 I’d argue that we see glimpses of Loras in the books— the real Loras— but we don’t get the full picture. We don’t get the full picture of any of the Tyrells, and I believe that’s part of the point. We don’t know what their motives really are and how many fingers they’ve got in which honey pots. I definitely think we see bits and pieces of Loras, but part of GRRM’s writing is to always question the narrator. Because we don’t see Loras from his own views, we’re not going to get the full picture.

 Also, Finn has read the books. He knows what’s up with him in the series thus far. In fact, he’s kind of snidely made jabs at the show for fucking with Loras…

(Source: renlyslittlerose, via chickren)